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Saturday, October 21, 2017

Jacobs - The Old Witch - Keeping the Public in Public Domain

  'Tis the season to tell spooky stuff!

(as if losing Net Neutrality isn't scary enough)

Of course some stories are scarier than others.  Today's story is on the gentler side, incorporating a familiar Tale Type I won't name before presenting it.  Next week I'll give a very different story I find especially haunting.

Both come from Joseph Jacobs' More English Folk Tales.  That link takes you to the five stories I've already used from his various anthologies.  He collected such a variety of folklore I haven't scratched the surface of his work.  All of his books were illustrated by John D. Batten.  I've mentioned Batten in the past because my own maternal lineage has Batten roots.  Fortunately the internet continues to grow.  The Batten link from Wikipedia is from this year and more recent than Sur La Lune's gallery  of his illustrations from ten years ago when they were unable to give further information about him personally.  Wikipedia's biographical information isn't very extensive, but it shows him living in England through his death in 1932.  Guess it was only the most distant of connections, if at all.  His artwork, however, is so interesting I must go back and edit previous posts to tag and credit him.

The Jacobs anthologies are pure gold mined in the days when folklorists were still beginning to preserve the oldest tales of Britain, Ireland, and Europe.  As a result I know I'm not familiar with all he collected and today's story is one I've missed before, but now find very useful.  (Those Tale Types I mentioned earlier are how storytellers can identify themes.)
 
There might be other versions, scarier versions where the witch might treat the other sister worse, but the thing I found most interesting was its use of the Kind and Unkind Girls Tale Type.  To understand more about this classification system, the Wikipedia article, The Aarne-Thompson classification systems, tells about it, including why, since 2004, it's now the ATU  types since Hans-Jörg Uther updated it.  (I also recommend following the link there to the Wikipedia article on Motifs as Thompson's motif index supplements tale types.)  A discussion of this particular tale type can be found on the SurLaLune Fairy Tales Blog article, Not really a Cinderella type: ATU480 the kind and unkind girls.  Personally I have found Asian tales where it's neither females nor even relatives, but the idea of one kind person being treated well, while an unkind person receives punishment.  This is good for pointing to the benefit of good actions without being didactic.

Next week I will present another Jacobs story.  It's one of my favorite tales to tell when spooky stories are requested.
*************


This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  



At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.
 
Other Public Domain story resources I recommend-
  • There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, maybe none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I have long recommended it and continue to do so.  He has loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so you can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression you like by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm
  • You may have noticed I'm no longer certain Dr. Perez has the largest database, although his offering the Motif Index certainly qualifies for those of us seeking specific types of stories.  There's another site, FairyTalez claiming to be the largest, with "over 2000 fairy tales, folktales, and fables" and they are "fully optimized for phones, tablets, and PCs", free and presented without ads.

    Between those two sites, there is much for story-lovers, but as they say in infomercials, "Wait, there's more!"
The email list for storytellers, Storytell, discussed Online Story Sources and came up with these additional suggestions:            
         - David K. Brown - http://people.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/stories.html
         - Richard Martin - http://www.tellatale.eu/tales_page.html
         - Spirit of Trees - http://spiritoftrees.org/featured-folktales
         - Story-Lovers - http://www.story-lovers.com/ is now only accessible through the Wayback Machine, described below, but Jackie Baldwin's wonderful site lives on there, fully searchable manually (the Google search doesn't work), at https://archive.org/ and put in http://www.story-lovers.com/ in the search box.  I recommend using the latest "snapshot" on November 2016
       - World of Tales - http://www.worldoftales.com/ 
   
You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!)  is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at
    You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!) is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at http://www.pjtss.net/library/.  
    Somebody as of this writing whose stories can still be found by his website is the late Chuck Larkin - http://chucklarkin.com/stories.html.  I prefer to list these sites by their complete address so they can be found by the Wayback Machine, a.k.a. Archive.org, when that becomes the only way to find them.
You can see why I recommend these to you. Have fun discovering even more stories!

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Building a Better World Is Still Needed

Evil will always find a way, but now is the time to train our children to Build a Better World.  Character education needs to happen if we want to grow better adults.

Priscilla Gorilla helped lead cheers about reading and more this past summer when Build a Better World was the summer reading program theme in libraries across the country.  There's a reason I think those cheers are still important. It's called an "earworm."

Sounds bad, but it doesn't need to be.  You've had earworms before when a song gets in your head and refuses to leave.  Cheerleading, like songs, can stick with you, popping out when needed or even unexpectedly.  A perfect example of that is an incorrect saying: Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me.  O.k. we know that's not true or verbal bullying wouldn't be a problem. 

Here's a picture of the building blocks from which audiences can choose to hear stories and cheers.

Not everyone can experience those stories, but these two past blog articles from 2017, June 17 and January 28, tell a lot about the program including several of the stories. Topics are Anger Management, Conflict Resolution, Cooperation, Courage, Creative Thinking, Forgiveness, Honesty, Patience, Persistence, Respect, and Responsibility.  Only one cheer, the one for Anger Management, has been posted and I'll repeat it here and the actions are given in parenthese.  Then come the others to use as your own resource.
Hey you angry folk
Come and clap your hands (clap, clap)
Stomp your feet (stomp, stomp)
You've got the beat (clap, clap)
Feel the groove (clap, clap)
Start to move (stomp, stomp)
Now have no fear / Take it in one ear
Just wait and send it out
Yes, twice just shout it out:
IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE OTHER!
IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE OTHER! 

F-R-I-E-N-D
F-R-I-E-N-D
To have a friend
Be a friend
Yes, indeed
F-R-I-E-N-D
F-R-I-E-N-D

I forgive you.
It doesn't change the past,
but it may change the future.

Build it up
BUILD IT UP
Let's get to it.
BUILD IT UP
You can do it --
BUILD A BETTER WORLD

(This next one fits several topics, just fill in the blank line with the negative action for the first and the positive for the second.)
Hey hey, ho ho
____________
has got to go!
Hey hey, ho ho
____________
is here to stay!

The final cheer uses part of a song's lyrics, but it's so appropriate for character education.
R-E-S-P-E-C-T
R-E-S-P-E-C-T
Find out what it means to me
R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Of course repetition is so important.  When used in schools, it's a vital resource for teachers to use again and again.

I hope schools can bring this program to their schools as they have daily exposure to the problems and the daily opportunity to cope with it.  The wisdom of the book of Proverbs 22:6 is the earworm coming to me as I close this: Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.




Saturday, October 7, 2017

Pandora (different versions) - Keeping the Public in Public Domain

By Frederick Stuart Church who was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan
I admit I'm a "News Junkie", but this week . . . We've all heard about Pandora's Box, but how many of us have really looked at the myth and how it fits our world?  I confess it took some digging and, depending on how you translate a Greek word, there is more than one way to interpret it ... especially after a week with yet another horrific mass shooting this story's worth a further look.

No, I don't favor guns, but understand gun control laws have too many ways around them.  The slogan about "only outlaws will have guns" could become true.  All of this made me surprised to hear about part of the Pandora's Box legend worth remembering. 

O.k. I'll give a hint.  The word is ἐλπίς.  What you don't know it?  The transliteration is Elpis and when I looked at the story, it makes a huge difference between whether it is Hope or Foreboding (some others translate it Expectation).  Since we're not Greeks living in classical times, earlier English versions will show why I think it's worth knowing about this long told story.  By the way, Hesiod's ancient Greek poem combines a farmer's almanac (now that's an Old Farmer's Almanac!) with the tale of Prometheus, which leads into that of Pandora, and the five ages of mankind.
Prometheus Carrying Fire by Jan Cossiers (Wikimedia Commons)


Go to Wikipedia's article for the Greek word and a brief summary of a story you may think you know.  You will discover the ancient Greek says it was a jar, how it was mistranslated as a box, and also discover the importance of Prometheus and his brother, Epimetheus -- not a frequently mentioned character.  The article doesn't say much about Erasmus, who mistranslated the jar as box, but he also is the reason our early English versions use the chief Roman god, Jupiter, instead of the Greek name for the king of the gods, Zeus. Erasmus was translating into Latin and he's the source of our English versions even though authors may claim Greek mythology and Hesiod as their source
Sheesh!  Is it any wonder many find mythology confusing?  At the article's end is a very helpful summary of Wikipedia links to ancient Greek mythology and religion.

On to the story! . . . or a trio of versions plus added illustrations.

Let's start with James Baldwin's Old Greek Stories, but you will note he uses Jupiter -- although Baldwin does give the alternative names when they first appear in the book -- and see how he translates ἐλπίς.  Back in 1895, when he published it, it was a third grade reader.  Can't help wondering how many third grade classes could manage it today.  I open with the second chapter after the theft of fire by Prometheus.
Can't find any information naming the illustrator with the faint signature
card by John William Waterhouse

I did search online and in Baldwin's biography in The Junior Book of Authors, but the illustrator remains ignored, even among all the Pandora art at Wikimedia Commons.  Here's another illustration from that collection of Pandora art which seems to hint at Foreboding.

So Baldwin used Foreboding and considered it good to have it trapped and unable to escape.

What started me on this search was hearing that Hope was in the box.  Here's the version librarian, writer, and anthologizer of many folktales, Frances Jenkins Olcott, crafted in The Wonder Garden.  She claims it's "Retold from Hesiod and Other Sources", but I notice her use of Jupiter.  Still she tells a good story, while keeping it simple. 
by Charles Lenoir (Wikimedia Commons)

Thomas Bulfinch is even more succinct in his The Age of Fable, keeping it to a single page if we pick the story up where Pandora appears.
I bothered with this, not only because Bulfinch is a standard reference to mythology, but also because he discusses the role of hope keeping us from becoming "completely wretched."  I also find interesting his discussing the other idea that she was sent in good faith to bless man.

Because Pandora was the Greek's name for the first woman, many have compared her to Eve.  A more recent book, Classical Mythology by Mark P.O. Morford and Robert J. Lenardon was begun with its first edition in 1971.  It's often used as a textbook or reference book for the topic.  Classical Mythology discusses the Biblical Eve comparison, but, more important to today's discussion, Hope is questioned if it's a "good" or an "evil."  Does it help us survive life's terrors or prolong the misery?

To see no hope or to see it as only prolonging our misery seems to me as deserving the label of Clinical Depression.  I have an idea for working with that hope which I plan to discuss next week.  Until then, one source I didn't use because the story is so changed by the author, Nathaniel Hawthorne, in his A Wonder Book for Girls & Boys (on pages 78 to 99) , but the title continues "with 60 Designs by Walter Crane"and they are a story unto themselves.  So however you view the story, I hope you enjoy Crane's artistic vision.


*************


This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  



At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.
 
Other Public Domain story resources I recommend-
  • There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, maybe none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I have long recommended it and continue to do so.  He has loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so you can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression you like by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm
  • You may have noticed I'm no longer certain Dr. Perez has the largest database, although his offering the Motif Index certainly qualifies for those of us seeking specific types of stories.  There's another site, FairyTalez claiming to be the largest, with "over 2000 fairy tales, folktales, and fables" and they are "fully optimized for phones, tablets, and PCs", free and presented without ads.

    Between those two sites, there is much for story-lovers, but as they say in infomercials, "Wait, there's more!"
The email list for storytellers, Storytell, discussed Online Story Sources and came up with these additional suggestions:            
         - David K. Brown - http://people.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/stories.html
         - Richard Martin - http://www.tellatale.eu/tales_page.html
         - Spirit of Trees - http://spiritoftrees.org/featured-folktales
         - Story-Lovers - http://www.story-lovers.com/ is now only accessible through the Wayback Machine, described below, but Jackie Baldwin's wonderful site lives on there, fully searchable manually (the Google search doesn't work), at https://archive.org/ and put in http://www.story-lovers.com/ in the search box.  I recommend using the latest "snapshot" on November 2016
       - World of Tales - http://www.worldoftales.com/ 
   
You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!)  is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at
    You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!) is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at http://www.pjtss.net/library/.  
    Somebody as of this writing whose stories can still be found by his website is the late Chuck Larkin - http://chucklarkin.com/stories.html.  I prefer to list these sites by their complete address so they can be found by the Wayback Machine, a.k.a. Archive.org, when that becomes the only way to find them.
You can see why I recommend these to you. Have fun discovering even more stories!

Saturday, September 30, 2017

"World War I and America" series






Today I'm speaking just to people able to attend events in the metro Detroit area BUT before you stop reading, since this is about a program that is grant funded, if you would like to bring my storytelling program your way, it may help to know my storytelling is recognized as grant worthy and is also part of the Michigan Humanities Council's Arts and Humanities Touring Directory.  The 2017 Arts and Humanities Touring Directory Grants are closed, but plan now for grants for 2018.  I value creative thinking and will work with you on funding your program, whether by a grant from the Humanities Council or elsewhere, or a sponsorship, or another way to bring storytelling to your audiences.
 
Storytelling can be included as part of a series offering varied approaches.  Telling about the U.S. World War I Centennial my Hello Girls program has sometimes been scheduled in mixed company.  I don't usually list my programs here, but because it gives an opportunity to discover such a rich assortment of experience by the various leaders, if you can join this series, I hope you will.  For readers able to go, here is further information.  To register, click on the underlined hotlinks given below.  The Orion Township Public Library location and contact information is given at the end.


The Orion Township Public Library has received a World War I and America grant, which marks the 100th anniversary of the nation’s entry into the war in 1917.  World War I and America’s principal objective is to bring veterans and their families together with the general public to explore the American experience of war and its role in shaping the contemporary world by reading, discussing, and sharing insights into the writings of Americans who experienced it firsthand.
To that end, we hope you can attend any or all of the following programs:

World War I and America Book Discussion Series

Wednesdays, 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM for Students, Adults, and
Senior CitizensWorld War I and America - Cover Img

Join Oakland University's Dr. Karen Miller as she moderates a series of three discussions of readings drawn from the book World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. In compiling World War I and America, distinguished scholars were invited to write brief essays related to World War I. The writers - soldiers, airmen, nurses, diplomats, statesmen, political activists, journalists — provide unique insight into how Americans perceived the war and how the conflict transformed American life. This evening the readings and discussion will follow the following themes:
  • Why Fight? October 11
  • The Experience of War October 18
  • Race and World War I  October 25
Register for the whole series or any of the evenings online, and stop by the library to pick up the readings being discussed so that you can read them ahead of time. Discussions will also include other forms of media related to each evening's themes. 

Monday, October 16,  7:00 PM to 8:30 PM for Adults
Discuss Ernest Hemingway's classic A Farewell to Arms
Copies are available now at the Adult Reference desk.







The rest of the series:





Hello Girl Collage

World War I “Hello Girl”, Oleda Joure Christides

Wednesday, November 1 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM for All Ages

World War I was won not only on the battlefield, but also at the phone switchboard. Join local storyteller Lois Keel as she shares the story of how bilingual operators helped General Pershing in France. Oleda was a Michigan teenager, a weekend musician, and a telephone supervisor who saw it all, including a 60 year battle to win veteran’s status.

Tuesday, November 14 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM for All Ages

Dr. Eric BeShears, clinical psychologist, with the John D. Dingell, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, will speak on the topic of PTSD and Moral Injury. The program is especially geared towards veterans and their family members, or anyone whose lives PTSD had affected. Topics discussed will include what PTSD is, what it looks like to loved ones, the toll it takes on family members, and what happens if PTSD is not treated. Also discussed will be the relatively new issue that is being addressed in the mental health field, Moral Injury. Dr. BeShears welcomes questions throughout his discussion, and the program can become as interactive as the audience prefers.

The Makings of Americans: A WWI Home Front Story

Saturday, November 18 from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM for All Ages

Historian Dennis Skupinski will present an interactive program about WWI and Michigan. Michigan's work force included many European workers who were affected when Michigan's industry was needed for the war effort. How did these workers react to war on their former countries? George Creel and the Committee on Public Information who promoted Nationalism, combating dissent and creating a patriotic "Home Front", will also be discussed. Veterans of any war and their families are invited attend and will have the opportunity to share their stories and/or reactions to the topics discussed.
 

This series is part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

825 Joslyn Road, Lake Orion, MI  48362



For more information contact reference@orionlibrary.org or call 248-693-3001.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Harvest Tales / Bailey - Haying Time - Keeping the Public in Public Domain

Autumn is a last gasp of summer's bounty, whether food or festivals.  Many now celebrate Harvest Festivals, so today I want to give a few ideas of how I (and you) do that in story.  Recently this program was around the campfire at a Yogi Bear Jellystone Park, so I'll also show how that camp was featured, although I've told at state parks and other campgrounds.

I like to start out with a bit of audience participation and began with a Jamaican tale found in Philip Sherlock's Anansi the Spider Man.  Unfortunately its copyright won't permit my giving it here, but I get the audience joining me in the chant of all those yams "On one leg, on two legs, on three legs, and four" coming after Tigre chanting the title of  "Ticky-Picky Boom-Boom" three times over, ending with Boof!  Because some little audience members were there, I make Tigre as dumb as possible and have a satisfying end when goat knocks them all into the water and later they make a great yam feast.  Don't want nightmares, although nightmares come from children working out other problems.

The group was young enough I didn't use the Caucasian tale of "Buried Treasure", instead using the Brothers Grimm story of "Cat and Mouse in Partnership" where the cat harvests something they were supposedly going to share and now they are no longer friends.  About this time a stretch was needed and the camp action "song" of "Hi, My name is Joe, and I work at the button factory" was changed to "Hi, my name is Yogi and I live at Jellystone Park.  One day the Ranger came and he said, 'Are you busy Yogi?'  I said 'No', so he said 'Then do this with your right paw'..."  Yogi waves; next the other paw harvests; then his feet stamp grapes; the ranger has him bang his head forward; finally when he asks, 'Are you busy Yogi?'  I said 'YES!'  The audience now was ready for "Tops and Bottoms" a tale told in many parts of the world about a trickster and a dupe (in this case a bear) agreeing to garden together with one getting the tops of what is grown and the other getting the bottoms.  The audience chooses either root crops or something where the top is eaten with our bear losing for two years straight, but finally smart enough to end the partnership.  The familiar song about "The Bear Went Over the Mountain" substituted Yogi for the word "Bear" and he was seeking honey.  I next told the Native American story about "The First Strawberries."  While a picture book of this by Joseph Bruchac identifies it as a Cherokee tale, I know of at least one book of Michigan tales from our Anishinaabe with the story, so, like the initial Anansi tale I said traveled in the minds of slaves from Africa to Jamaica, I believe this story also traveled.  It is told among more than one of our Native American nations and I tell it as an Anishinaabe might.  I also stress that in the beginning Gitchi Manito (usually translated the Great Spirit) made all three of the fruits right then.  I start with blueberries since I was in an area known for blueberries, including U-Pick farms, explaining raspberries now are harvested in autumn, with strawberries in the spring.

Here's where today's Public Domain story appeared.  I definitely re-told it since they needed a quick introduction to Arthur Scott Bailey's Cuffy Bear, who has appeared here in other Public Domain postings.  I also explained how, before tractors, horses mowed hay and I taught the audience to make the sound effect of the blades in Cuffy's adventure.  Here's a wonderful picture of such a team in action.
Photographer (Steve) Sam Jackson's Flickr picture of

Mr John Dodd and his lovely working horses at Silly Wrea farm near Allendale in Northumberland

  https://www.facebook.com/YorkshireSamphotography/

This is a two-part adventure and at the division I'll keep the page without cropping to avoid the size difference when the first part ends, but keep reading as Cuffy is Cuffy, and that bear's guaranteed to get into trouble.  Also see how Baked Beans + a Bear = trouble.
 

After that, for those little ones needing a night-night bit of repetition, I told something sometimes called a "French Irritating Tale."  I prefer calling them Unending Stories, but it's about a king who loves stories and promises half his kingdom to anyone telling a story that gets him to call out "STOP!"  This of course happens when "an ant went into the barn and took another grain of wheat..." is the story over and over.

Finally I officially finished by telling in voice and sign language, teaching the signs, to a story with many versions.  A recent version, The Magic Bojabi Tree, adapted by Dianne Hofmeyr attributes it to a 1923 version about the African tree able to provide all the fruits of the world if the animals just call out its unusual name.  I'm sure I have seen an earlier anthology with it, but haven't gone hunting for it.  I use a different name easily finger-spelled and from yet another picture book version of it.

By this time I had a few devoted listeners not wanting to leave, so I told the "Fill the House" story of three children of an old farmer with only the farm to leave to whomever is wisest.  The same money is given to all three and the farm would go to whomever spends it to fill the farmhouse.  The first bought balloons, but that didn't fill it.  The second bought candles which filled much, but not all the house's dark spaces.  The third spent it on inviting friends to fill the house with story and song and it did.  I said we had filled Yogi's campground with story and song and now this "encore" was for them to fill wherever they went with what they had heard and helped tell.
http://www.southhavenjellystone.com/

A great harvest indeed at Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park in South Haven and beyond.

*************

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Talk Like a Pirate / Pyle - "The Pirate Avary" - Keeping the Public in Public Domain


Seen last weekend while storytelling in South Haven...Piracy on the Great Lakes?!?
AAARGH!  Facebook's International Talk Like A Pirate Day says Krispy Kreme after 4 years isn't giving out free donuts on September 19, International Talk Like a Pirate Day, BUT Long John Silver's is upping the ante with a "bar of gold"... a Deep Fried Twinkie.  (With pirates you expected health food?!?)

For a great Public Domain book on Pirates, you really must see Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates or as the title page explains: Fiction, Fact & Fancy concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main.  (I challenge you to read the first chapter to learn how they came to be known as "buccaneers" and also about the practice of marooning.) Howard Pyle was both illustrator and author.  I value his anthologies and no less than Vincent Van Gogh said Pyle's artwork "struck me dumb with admiration."  The pirate book just comes in under the wire as Public Domain and was compiled by his publisher, Harper, and Merle Johnson, after his death.

To challenge you to hunt up the book brimming with pirate pictures, I won't give more than the book's traditional cover and this brief story about a pirate fun to tell.  Avast, maties!
No picture of the Captain is known, but the Avarians are an ethnic subgroup within the Russian Caucasus known for their warlike origins.  Prior to invading the Caucasus they were in the mix of Eastern Europe known as Pannonia in the late 8th and early to mid-9th century
Source: The forum at Paradox Interactive - specifically https://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/index.php?threads/cultures-in-pannonia-and-its-surroundings-in-769-and-867.959369/
It's the perfect background for an early Pirate.  It's enough to Shiver me timbers!
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This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  



At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.
 
Other Public Domain story resources I recommend-
  • There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, maybe none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I have long recommended it and continue to do so.  He has loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so you can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression you like by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm
  • You may have noticed I'm no longer certain Dr. Perez has the largest database, although his offering the Motif Index certainly qualifies for those of us seeking specific types of stories.  There's another site, FairyTalez claiming to be the largest, with "over 2000 fairy tales, folktales, and fables" and they are "fully optimized for phones, tablets, and PCs", free and presented without ads.

    Between those two sites, there is much for story-lovers, but as they say in infomercials, "Wait, there's more!"
The email list for storytellers, Storytell, discussed Online Story Sources and came up with these additional suggestions:            
         - David K. Brown - http://people.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/stories.html
         - Richard Martin - http://www.tellatale.eu/tales_page.html
         - Spirit of Trees - http://spiritoftrees.org/featured-folktales
         - Story-Lovers - http://www.story-lovers.com/ is now only accessible through the Wayback Machine, described below, but Jackie Baldwin's wonderful site lives on there, fully searchable manually (the Google search doesn't work), at https://archive.org/ and put in http://www.story-lovers.com/ in the search box.  I recommend using the latest "snapshot" on November 2016
       - World of Tales - http://www.worldoftales.com/ 
   
You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!)  is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at
    You're going to find many of the links on these sites have gone down, BUT go to the Internet Archive Wayback Machine to find some of these old links.  Tim's site, for example, is so huge probably updating it would be a full-time job.  In the case of Story-Lovers, it's great that Jackie Baldwin set it up to stay online as long as it did after she could no longer maintain it.  For an example of using the "Wayback Machine", list member, Papa Joe is on both Tim Sheppard's site and Story-Lovers, but he no longer maintains his old Papa Joe's Traveling Storytelling Show website and his Library (something you want to see!) is gone, but using the Wayback Machine you can still see it.  At the Wayback Machine I put in his site's address, then chose 2006 since it was a later year and clicked until I reached the Library at http://www.pjtss.net/library/.  
    Somebody as of this writing whose stories can still be found by his website is the late Chuck Larkin - http://chucklarkin.com/stories.html.  I prefer to list these sites by their complete address so they can be found by the Wayback Machine, a.k.a. Archive.org, when that becomes the only way to find them.
You can see why I recommend these to you. Have fun discovering even more stories!