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Saturday, February 13, 2016

Hearn/Chamberlain - The Silly Jelly-Fish - Keeping the Public in Public Domain


2016 Chinese Monkey YearThe Chinese New Year started February 8 for 2016 with the Year of the Monkey. 

Went looking for an appropriate story and was surprised to find Lafcadio Hearn wrote one complete with not only a monkey, but dragons, and a pourquois tale of how the jellyfish became the way it is.  Went looking for it and the Internet Archive had the story as written in English by Basil Hall Chamberlain in Kobunsha's Japanese fairy tale series -- no. 13.  If you go to Google Books, however, you will see the exact same text in Hearn's Japanese Fairy Tales, pp. 36-41. Who wrote it?  My bet is on Hearn.

Leave it to a tricky monkey to fool everyone.  This is essentially the story told in India as The Monkey's Heart where a monkey fools a crocodile.  


The classic Index to Fairy Tales by Mary Huse Eastman puts the story in many Public Domain volumes by many authors of the late 19th and early 20th century starting with Hearn, but does not mention Chamberlain.  I've many of them, but they and the Google book by Hearn miss the lovely illustrations found on the Internet Archive edition attributed to Chamberlain, which is also Public Domain, so it would be as silly as a jelly-fish to omit them.  The MARC record doesn't tell who did the illustrations, possibly Chamberlain?  It only says they are hand-colored and "Printed on one side of double leaves of crepe paper, folded in the traditional Japanese style."  It does claim "told in English by B. H. Chamberlain." To make the illustrations look right, I tried to put two side by side, but the software for this blog isn't permitting it even when I keep them smaller.  At least this makes the text and illustrations more legible since I can reproduce them larger for you. 




































































So Monkey had his fun with the jelly-fish and us, keeping us guessing if Lafcadio Hearn did indeed write "The Silly Jelly-Fish" or Chamberlain.  The story was quite popular so you may enjoy tracking down more than one version.  Here are some other Public Domain versions of the tale: Griffis - "Jellyfish Takes a Journey" in Green Willow; Lang - "The Monkey and the Jelly-Fish" in both his Violet Fairy Book and another less common book called Twelve Huntsmen and Other Stories; Ozaki - "Jelly Fish and the Monkey" in Japanese Fairy Book; Singleton - "Silly Jelly Fish" in Wild Flower Fairy Book; Wiggin and Smith - "Silly Jelly Fish" in Tales of Laughter.  To find the Indian versions about the crocodile, there are fewer, but my favorite is Babbitt's "Monkey and the Crocodile" in Jataka Tales.

Here are a few illustrations from some of those versions:  the first three are in Yei Theodora Ozaki's Japanese Fairy Book and fit the story above


the last is from Andrew Lang's Violet Fairy Book and is by H.J.Ford -- notice the story is clearly very different, for example there are no dragons, so you might want to compare his "The Monkey and the Jelly-Fish."
So Happy New Year, either the Chinese Year of the Monkey or 2016.
******************
This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  


At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.  
 


There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I recommended it earlier and want to continue to do so.  He has just loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so one can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression he likes by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm

He also loaded to his server the doctorate thesis of Prof. Dov Noy (Neunan) "Motif-index of Talmudic-Midrahic literature" Indiana University, 1954, as a PDF file.
in the hope that some of you would make use of it.

You can see why that is a site I recommend to you.

Have fun discovering even more stories!


Saturday, February 6, 2016

Lang - The Goat's Ears of the Emperor Trojan - Keeping the Public in Public Domain

Goat.svgSometimes I get bothered by the way goats get ranked lower than sheep.  Think about the implications when talking about the phrase "separating the sheep from the goats."  Even the Chinese Year of the Goat, which is about to end, is sometimes listed as the Year of the Sheep or the Year of the Ram.  BAAAAA!

I've raised goats.  They're social animals and smart.  Sheep aren't usually described that way.  They also can be stubborn, maybe that fits sheep, too, I'm not sure.  They are fairly good at eating omniverously -- if you still have your Christmas tree and it has no chemical treatment, they love it!  They do not eat tin cans.  That myth came because they love eating the glue and paper labels on cans.
Before the Year of the Goat ends and we have to wait another 12 years, I went looking for a good goat-related story and knew I couldn't resist the very popular Serbian tale about the Emperor Trajan (Lang lists him as Trojan).  Lang attributes the story to Volksmarchen der Serben but this is all I found in a translation of that book:

Classic and Mediæval Influence
When paganism had disappeared, the Southern-Slavonic legends received many elements from the Greeks and Romans. There are references to the Emperors Trajan and Diocletian as well as to mythical personages. In the Balkans, Trajan is often confused with the Greek king Midas. In the year 1433 Chevalier Bertrandon de la Broquière heard from the Greeks at Trajanople that this city had been built by the Emperor Trajan, who had goat’s ears. The historian Tzetzes also mentions that emperor’s goat’s ears ὠτία τράγου. In Serbian legends the Emperor Trajan seems also to be confused with Dædalus, for he is given war-wings in addition to the ears.

The actual story is fairly short and, since the actual Trajan, while the first non-Italian Roman emperor, probably wasn't too popular in Serbia, I imagine it originated as a bit of fun poked at the emperor.  Coins of the day don't show goat's ears, but what emperor would have permitted that?  Still this comment from a coin collector is fun: The Emperor With Many Faces

Many of the coins of Trajan feature a marvelous heroic and realistic bust. However, when Trajan was raised to emperor the mints were faced with a quandry as they had no official portraits to copy for their engraving. Trajan complicated the issue by staying on the frontier with his troops a full year before returning to Rome. Thus, many of the early coins minted during his first consulship [COS II, 97-99 CE] bear images that were the best guesses of the celators. Often the images have a distinctive Nerva look.

I knew I had heard this story before, but I checked Amazon and  the only picture book version re-telling by Katarina Jovanovic and illustrated by Phillippe Beha doesn't look familiar.





Here's Lang's version of the story.


I like playing Native American flutes and now have one from somewhere in the former Yugoslavia, possibly from Serbia.  Bet the stories behind the making of my flutes can't match this one!

Whether your New Year has begun or is about to end and become the Chinese Year of the Monkey, happy storytelling!
******************
This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  


At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.  
 


There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I recommended it earlier and want to continue to do so.  He has just loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so one can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression he likes by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm

He also loaded to his server the doctorate thesis of Prof. Dov Noy (Neunan) "Motif-index of Talmudic-Midrahic literature" Indiana University, 1954, as a PDF file.
in the hope that some of you would make use of it.

You can see why that is a site I recommend to you.

Have fun discovering even more stories!

Saturday, January 30, 2016

World Read Aloud Day 2016 and Trans-Pacific Partnership

Are you looking ahead?  Remember there's lots of ideas at Storytelling + Research = LoiS ... although the actual address became a bit ridiculous.  Wish I'd known my "+" and "=" wouldn't show up.  

For lots to read, just look for the many posts here under "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" or "Public Domain" to find many wonderful stories -- and my added information about their books and authors -- now in Public Domain and deserving to be remembered.  Haven't figured out why there are 3 more in the first category.  Probably I missed putting Public Domain on 3, but 116 versus 119 posts is too daunting to check for such minor revision only I would probably notice.

Just remember the importance of Public Domain, especially when you hear about the coming agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

I had hopes for this as international partnership is needed, but I keep finding entirely too many things the U.S. Congress will no longer be able to control by legislation: our copyright mess (it passes it along to other countries), rules concerning safety and labeling of foods, access to healthcare and medicine, regulation of banks, rights or workers, future energy sources and so much more. Essentially, its scope is everything.  The history of trade agreements since NAFTA shows these types of trade agreements produce trade deficits, lost jobs, lower wages, and environmental damage.

TPP also undermines the Internet as well as weakening U.S. democracy and sovereignty. VOTE IT DOWN, Congress!

For those wanting to know more about this agreement, here's Wikipedia's look at it.   I strongly recommend you look at the Criticism section of it, especially the part about Intellectual Property as even Fair Use such as occurs on World Read Aloud Day will be affected.  The United States will probably not hear much about it until this coming summer or after our elections as a "lame duck" session is most likely.  It would be wise to keep aware of this agreement precisely because it will affect both Copyright and the Public Domain.  Digital Rights are especially going to be impacted.  This is why the non-profit Electronic Frontier Foundation deserves your support or at least following what they say.  That last link was to their Wikipedia article, but drop down to the bottom for External Links to their own website and useful articles at places we frequently recommend (because they host so many of our Public Domain books) like Project Gutenberg and the Internet Archive.

Freedom to read and publish needs our support.

******************
This isn't my usual "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" post, but my usual recommendations and Copyright rant still seem worth publishing here.  Happy Reading and Storytelling!
******************
This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  


At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.  
 


There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I recommended it earlier and want to continue to do so.  He has just loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so one can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression he likes by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm

He also loaded to his server the doctorate thesis of Prof. Dov Noy (Neunan) "Motif-index of Talmudic-Midrahic literature" Indiana University, 1954, as a PDF file.
in the hope that some of you would make use of it.

You can see why that is a site I recommend to you.

Have fun discovering even more stories!

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Jan. 25 - The Importance of Robert Burns

This was written a while back by Scottish storyteller, Tim Porteus, for the international online network, Professional Storyteller.  It's almost Burns Night and I'm grateful that Tim gave me permission at the time to repeat his article and the discussion which followed.

As January 25th approaches Scotland gears up for Burns Night, when we celebrate our national poet's birthday. Burns however is not our national poet by government decree, but by popular opinion of the people. His work reflects his lifelong passion for social justice, based on his own experiences of brutal economic landlordism as well as social snobbery even when he was a famous poet. He was a man of the people.

More than that, for Scots he spoke the language of the people, and wrote in it. So on Burns Night we eat peasant food, sing oor ain sangs in oor ain leid, hae a blether wi oot havin tae feel that awfy cringe that oor high heid yins hae put intae oor hearts n heids aboot oor ain leid. Oan this day, aboon a' ithers, we can screive the way we talk, we can hae a sang an no fash aboot oor wurds, cause we can be prood o' them. Oor bairns can yaise their heritage wi oot censure frae ignorant fowk wha constantly put doon the way they speak, and inferiorise their wurd.

Sae as Janurar 25th approaches, lets celebrate no jist the Scots leid, but a' leids frae a' ower the warld which hae hae experience o' marginalisation an inferiorisation, cause we are , tae quote Burns himsel, "brothers (and sisters) for a' that" . So tae a' the folk wha I ken, an those wha I dinnae ken yet, on 25th turn aff the telly an computer, an get yersel oot tae a Burns event and celebrate by makin guid craick yersels!!
An if ye want ony advice on how tae dae it, then let me ken.

Tim

Because Professional Storyteller offers a network for discussion, the following comments were made.

Replies to This Discussion

how do you  do Mr.porteus, I would like to introduce my self to you, and trough this opportunity I would like to ask you. My question is how to be  a good story teller?how I  have to practicing my self on this? so thank you before.


regards,


steven
Our local storytelling group tells at the Highland Games here annually.  It will be the 162d annual St. Andrew's Society of Detroit  Highland Games this summer.  Your comments lead this Stirling descendant to want to include a wee bit o' Burns.

Hiya Lois,

let me ken if ye want ony help!

Tim
Thanks, Tim.  It's a laing while awaa.  (August)  I'll mull it o'er & yell out if need be.
Lois(ummer; what a concept!)

http://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/2342
We hae a census takin place here in Mairch, and fir the first time folk are goanie be asked if they can speil in or screive Scots. Mony folk can hae a richt guid blether in the leid but dinnae ken it, cause it's bin drilled intae oor heids that whan we yaise the words they're just examples o' bad English. But o' course it 's really the ither way roond!! :-)
Too funny, Tim!

I once auditioned for a Renaissance festival as a seanachie, but they musta thought similarly as I laid the Scots on wi' a ladle.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Appreciate a Dragon Day




Today is Appreciate a Dragon Day.
Chloe (Midnight Storytellers), the Dragon Whisperer

Honest!  It is officially listed as that.

There have been other posts here about Dragons and that link currently gives you three (3!) stories from the Keeping the Public in Public Domain.  Today I want to give something more.

My British storytelling colleague, Chloe, of Midnight Storytellers, and I started talking on the international network of storytellers, Professional Storyteller, about her work as a Dragon Whisperer.  She has generously given me permission to repeat what was said.  Librarian that I still am, we both mention some dragon books worth reading.

What started this was I mentioned my friend, Loretta Vitek, (found here at Loretta Vitek) and her love of the saying "Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crispy and would be good with sauce!" and Chloe responded:
Hi Lois, The Brit version is "Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons - for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup" ;)
I have another window / bumper sticker which says 'Sometimes the dragon wins'.
I've fascinated by dragons since I was 8 years old. A family friend with a talent for drama read The Hobbit to his children and me on joint family holidays. Then he read us Farmer Giles of Ham. I still love both. I think it was worth wading through excessive film hours to see Smaug gloriously realised - and voiced!!
My idea of dragons is like C S Lewis' idea of Aslan - not a tame lion... At DCHQ [Dragon Conservation Headquarters] we tell apprentices "Only The Keenest Survive".
This summer I was the world's first (probably) ever Dragon Whisperer in Residence at my local stately home Sudeley Castle. It's now just a Victorian replica of castle-ness but the place has links with King Henry VIII (the one with all the wives...) and has a lovely garden surrounded by farm meadows. A little place of magic in the Cotswolds.
What brought you to dragons?
Kind regards, Chloë.

My reply was:

Hi Chloe,
Finally free of a very challenging play I was in.  Wanted to do justice to a reply.
Ketchup?  Thought that was strictly American.  At least expected a Brit to call it Catsup.  (Now the word looks like a funny derivation should be hunted up.)
Tolkien's Hobbit's dragon also got me started back when I was a teen and reading it one summer. 
My favorite dragons are the Asian ones -- powerful, but not intentionally like the European ones who are so often either greedy or worse.  (Not that such stories aren't fun to tell, too.)  Presume you also know the Scottish, Assipattle vs. the Sea Monster tale -- title varies.  Such fun to tell and, while not a dragon, so dragon-like.  In contrast I also like Kenneth Grahame's Reluctant Dragon for the relationship between the little boy and the dragon.  That reminds me of Ruth Sawyer's The Year of the Christmas Dragon, with another boy + dragon friendship.  It's too little known, but I love its explanation of why so many in the western hemisphere look Asian.  As for Asian dragons, there are too many to count and I love to count their toes to see if they are imperial dragons or not. 
Something that really sticks in my mind from generations ago is "Day of the Dragon", a short story in Alfred Hitchcock's Monster Museum.  A professor, who has had his reputation ruined because he writes for the tabloids, experiments on a male and female alligator, giving them fully functioning hearts, whereupon they evolve back into dragons and wind up taking over the world.  Definitely a case of "Sometimes the dragon wins."  Love that saying, too.  Thanks for telling me about it.
Do you know P.S. member, Jill Lamede?  She does the Tintagel Dragon and even has a book, Tales of the Tintagel Dragon.  You would probably enjoy her website, http://www.lamede.com/index.html, especially http://www.lamede.com/page10.html.  If you get in touch with her, by all means be sure to say hello from me!
Happy whispering, Chloe!
LoiS(ssssss!)
P.S. I've enjoyed our conversation on this.  Would you mind my quoting any of it, complete with full credit and links to your information and site, in a blog I do?  Storytelling + Research = LoiS could do with another look at dragons.  Here's the two I've done there so far: http://www.storytellingresearchlois.com/search/label/dragons

Donita K. Paul
As you can tell, Chloe said "Yes", although by now there are three stories at that link.  It was worth saving until Appreciate a Dragon Day which you may want to know was started by the author, Donita K. Paul, back in 2004 to promote the release of her award nominated book, DragonSpell, which became a 5-book series.  If you go to the AaD Day link above you will find it includes additional dragon resources for those of us who do indeed appreciate them. For anybody wanting to read more dragon stories there is a bibliography page of recommended books, as well as not one but two pages of program and flat out sizzling fun with her AaD Day page and then additional links given as Bright Ideas.


By the way, when I mentioned Professional Storyteller, I want to back up just a bit and mention you can find Chloe's page there gives even more information about her.  Professional Storyteller is an excellent resource for and about storytellers and storytelling.  For my storytelling friends it gives a free page of promotion, the opportunity to blog, post photos and videos, and even promote storytelling events.  The discussion groups there aren't overwhelmingly busy, but are yet another resource both for public viewing and conversation.  Members can post on each other's page or email there privately and the search box gives a wonderful means of locating other storytellers nearby and also when traveling.  Here's my own page there.  Can you tell I consider PS a resource worth promoting?

But as they say in television infomercials "Don't Stop There!"
I also want to mention another dragon-loving, and, of course, dragon-telling British storyteller, Jill Lamede, she is a resource mentioned here earlier when trying to find more about something happening at Land's End, another name for Cornwall and Tintagel where she lives and works. Back then I said: Then I remembered Jill Lamede, whose delightful Tales of the Tintagel Dragon is now available on Kindle.  I had bought from her a hard copy of the book years ago, ordering it for Mount Clemens Public Library so I could tell it.  It's still there and I finally remembered her saying another name for Tintagel was Land's End.  That's Cornwall!
As Jill recently reminded me, Tintagel is not very far from Lands End, both are in the magical county of Cornwall in the furthest southwest toe of England.

I especially enjoyed the summer she even worked with me to use her book at the library.  Jill (also on Professional Storyteller where she has so far posted 6 videos) has always been a great online friend to me starting way back with the international email list, Storytell, sponsored by the National Storytelling Network.  NSN is truly a member-driven organization for those of us who love storytelling, so I also urge you to go to the jam-packed website if you are a storyteller, want to find a storyteller, or just want to know more about storytelling.


You just never know what we storytellers might share with each other to resolve research questions.  I'm delighted to have the friendship of both these British storytellers and my local storytelling friend, Loretta Vitek.  If you scroll down to the bottom of North Oakland County Storyteller's directory of members you will find more about Loretta.  Just be sure to remember her warning, which I slightly misquoted.  It should say Do not meddle in the affairs of Dragons, for thou would be crispy & good with sauce or Chloe's British version "Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons - for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup"  Either way, be sure you do your appreciating dragons carefully.

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Bailey - The Birthday Stick - Keeping the Public in Public Domain

The White Rabbit by John Tenniel
Let's hear it for Un-Birthdays with today's story!  If it should actually be your birthday, here's a story about measuring up to be the best you can be...sounds like all those New Year's Resolutions. 

I want to say more after the story (which isn't from Alice in Wonderland) about a great Alice in Wonderland site, because the concept of Un-birthdays originated in Lewis Carroll's wonderful nonsense.  It might be called "illogic", but there's always a ring of truth in his work and shouldn't be dismissed as just for children. 

Before today's story, at the risk of saying this twice like the White Rabbit, "I'm late! I'm late", that's what made me look for a birthday story.  Too often I'm late getting out birthday wishes.  It's especially bad, not just for me, but for most people when it comes close to those with end of the year birthdays around the holidays.  I posted earlier this week on Facebook an apology to friends with birthdays recently.  It's no excuse, but I said: You are probably used to it, since the holidays get everybody's attention, but I've a few other things happening, too, so I feel like I've been worse than usual at wishing you had a great birthday. Happy Un-Birthday!"

I've often posted stories by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey as she not only published a great deal, but her writing is fairly close to being tellable without a lot of changes.  She knew how to reach an audience and wrote a lot on seasonal and special times of the year.  In fact earlier I gave a birthday story by her, "The Princess Who Saw Herself", about a tomboy of a princess I called "not your typical fairy tale princess, but more of a terror of a princess."  Here's a prince receiving a birthday present that, like the fairy godmother's gift in "Sleeping Beauty", is not what was expected.  Since New Year's and Birthdays are milestones, they're a perfect time to see if we are measuring up to all we might be.  That's the theme behind today's story from Bailey.  She calls it a folk tale but doesn't give the source.  Maybe it is, but it's also very much from the fortunate Miss Bailey.




Photograph of Lenny
Lenny de Rooy, creator of Alice-in-Wonderland.net
So if today should actually be your birthday, consider this your special present.  For the rest of us, let's enjoy our Un-birthday!  If you're at all interested in Alice in Wonderland, I recommend Alice-in-Wonderland.net/ where you can find so much for lovers of the original story and more.  That "more" includes not only Alice in Wonderland, and the sequel of Through the Looking Glass, complete with a lost chapter, and even the original manuscript which started it all, but also The Nursery ‘Alice’, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland retold for children ‘from nought to five’, but as they say on t.v. "infomercials", That's Not All!  Disney's movie script and illustrations are given along with all the wonderful illustrations by John Tenniel, complete with information about him and also Alice Liddell, Carroll's inspiration for the stories.  There are other things like quotes, links, and trivia, enough to satisfy serious researchers, but also resources to throw your own Mad Tea Party, even ideas for an Alice inspired Christmas tree, playing cards, a store to purchase Alice items, a forum, and the blog by Lenny de Rooy, the site creator.  


“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.
“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”
“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.
“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”
 

******************
Don't go away mad.  Come back next week to see what's here.

This is part of a series of postings of stories under the category, "Keeping the Public in Public Domain."  The idea behind Public Domain was to preserve our cultural heritage after the authors and their immediate heirs were compensated.  I feel strongly current copyright law delays this intent on works of the 20th century.  My own library of folklore includes so many books within the Public Domain I decided to share stories from them.  I hope you enjoy discovering new stories.  


At the same time, my own involvement in storytelling regularly creates projects requiring research as part of my sharing stories with an audience.  Whenever that research needs to be shown here, the publishing of Public Domain stories will not occur that week.  This is a return to my regular posting of a research project here.  (Don't worry, this isn't dry research, my research is always geared towards future storytelling to an audience.)  Response has convinced me that "Keeping the Public in Public Domain" should continue along with my other postings as often as I can manage it.  
 


There are many online resources for Public Domain stories, none for folklore is as ambitious as fellow storyteller, Yoel Perez's database, Yashpeh, the International Folktales Collection.  I recommended it earlier and want to continue to do so.  He has just loaded Stith Thompson's Motif Index into his server as a database so one can search the whole 6 volumes for whatever word or expression he likes by pressing one key. http://folkmasa.org/motiv/motif.htm

He also loaded to his server the doctorate thesis of Prof. Dov Noy (Neunan) "Motif-index of Talmudic-Midrahic literature" Indiana University, 1954, as a PDF file.
in the hope that some of you would make use of it.

You can see why that is a site I recommend to you.

Have fun discovering even more stories!